Health Life

High levels of clinician burnout identified at leading cardiac centre

Chair and Medical Director of the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, UHN Credit: UHN

More than half the clinicians surveyed at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre reported burnout and high levels of distress according to a series of studies published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal Open (CMAJ-OPEN). In these studies carried out before the COVID-19 pandemic, 78% of nurses, 73% of allied health staff and 65% of physicians described experiencing burnout.

“In my 35 years as a physician I have never seen a more serious issue for clinicians than ,” says lead author Dr. Barry Rubin, Chair and Medical Director, the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, UHN.

Completed in 2019, the study used the Well-Being Index, a survey tool developed by the Mayo Clinic, a globally recognized academic medical centre. 414 physicians, nurses and allied health staff answered a series of questions about the level of stress they experienced in the previous month.

The index measured fatigue, depression, burnout, anxiety or stress, mental and physical quality of life, work-life integration, meaning in work and distress.

The study also evaluated the respondent’s perception of the adequacy of staffing levels, and of fair treatment in the workplace. The results were then compared to outcomes for corresponding at academic health science centres in the United States.

  • 78% of nurses, 73% of allied health staff and 65% of physicians described burnout in the month prior to when the survey was administered.
  • 79% of nurses, 56% of allied health staff and 55% of physicians had high levels of distress.
  • Lower levels of distress among all clinicians were associated with a perception of fair treatment at work and a perception of adequate staffing levels.

The impact of burnout on clinicians can include extreme fatigue, professional dissatisfaction, job turnover, decreased quality of

Health article

New COVID-19 Variants | CDC

Information about the characteristics of these variants is rapidly emerging. Scientists are working to learn more about how easily they might spread, whether they could cause more severe illness, and whether currently authorized vaccines will protect people against them. At this time, there is no evidence that these variants cause more severe illness or increased risk of death.

What we know

US COVID-19 Cases Caused by Variants

View a map showing the number of confirmed cases in each state.

Viruses constantly change through mutation, and new variants of a virus are expected to occur over time. Sometimes new variants emerge and disappear. Other times, new variants emerge and persist. Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been documented in the United States and globally during this pandemic.

The virus that causes COVID-19 is a type of coronavirus, a large family of viruses. Coronaviruses are named for the crown-like spikes on their surfaces. Scientists monitor changes in the virus, including changes to the spikes on the surface of the virus. These studies, including genetic analyses of the virus, are helping us understand how changes to the virus might affect how it spreads and what happens to people who are infected with it.

Multiple COVID-19 variants are circulating globally. In the United Kingdom (UK), a new variant has emerged with an unusually large number of mutations. This variant seems to spread more easily and quickly than other variants. Currently, there is no evidence that it causes more severe illness or increased risk of death. This variant was first detected in September 2020 and is now highly prevalent in London and southeast England. It has since been detected in numerous countries around the world, including the United States and Canada.

In South Africa, another variant has emerged independently of the variant