Health Life

Artificial intelligence tool for reading MRI scans could transform prostate cancer surgery and treatment

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Researchers at the Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics (CCIPD) at Case Western Reserve University have preliminarily validated an artificial intelligence (AI) tool to predict how likely the disease is to recur following surgical treatment for prostate cancer.

The tool, called RadClip, uses AI algorithms to examine a variety of data, from MRI scans to . The research team included Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals and the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Administration Medical Center.

“This tool can help urologists, oncologists and surgeons create better treatment plans so that their patients can have the most precise treatment,” said Lin Li, a doctoral student in Case Western Reserve’s Biomedical Engineering Department and a member of the CCIPD team that developed the tool. “RadClip allows physicians to evaluate the aggressiveness of the and the response to treatment so they don’t overtreat or undertreat the patient.”

Li is first author on a study used to validate the tool, which appeared this month in The Lancet‘s EBioMedicine journal. While other studies on have examined data from single sites, the CCIPD study included MRI scans from Cleveland Clinic, The Mount Sinai Hospital, University Hospitals and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

The multi-institutional study applied RadClip AI tool to pre-operative scans from nearly 200 patients whose surgeons removed their because of cancer, then compared its results of other predictive approaches—as well as the patients’ outcomes in succeeding years.

One of the critical questions in managing cancer in men undergoing surgery is identifying which are at highest risk of recurrence and prostate cancer-specific mortality so they can be identified early for additional therapy.

While RadClip has been shown to be able to predict the risk of disease recurrence, will be needed

Health article

Cold-weather wellness: Tips for staying healthy this season

Staying healthy during colder months is the first step in making sure you can enjoy all the activities the season brings. 

When you are indoors more during the fall and winter, you may be closer to other people. This can increase your chances of catching viruses that cause colds, the flu, or COVID-19. Dry winter air can also weaken natural mucus barriers in the nose, mouth, and lungs, where viruses can enter the body. 

Get a flu shot

Each year, the seasonal flu sickens millions and causes thousands of hospitalizations and flu-related deaths in the U.S. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone 6 months of age and older. Flu vaccines are updated each year to best protect against new strains of the flu virus.

Reduce the spread 

To help reduce the spread of the flu, colds, and other viruses, including COVID-19, you should: 

  • Wash your hands frequently. It is the best way to protect yourself from catching illnesses. 
  • Wipe down surfaces around you with a sanitizing cleaner. 
  • Keep a distance from those who are sick. 
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. 
  • Stay hydrated, so you can flush toxins out of your system. 
  • Get enough sleep to keep your immune system strong. 

Make nutritious choices

Eating a diet full of vegetables, fruits, lean protein, and whole grains can also help you stay healthy during the colder months. Consider treats that will satisfy cravings but have less fat and added sugar, and also keep an eye on portion size. When making your food shopping list during the holidays, think about healthier alternatives to traditional comfort foods. 

Stay active

Shorter days and colder weather may lead you to exercise less. But even moderate exercise, like a brisk walk, raking leaves, or climbing stairs, can

Health Life

Following the hops of disordered proteins could lead to future treatments of Alzheimer’s disease

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Researchers from the University of Cambridge, the University of Milan and Google Research have used machine learning techniques to predict how proteins, particularly those implicated in neurological diseases, completely change their shapes in a matter of microseconds.

They found that when , a implicated in Alzheimer’s disease, adopts a highly disordered shape, it actually becomes less likely to stick together and form the toxic clusters which lead to the death of brain cells.

The results, reported in the journal Nature Computational Science, could aid in the future development of treatments for diseases involving disordered proteins, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.

“We are used to thinking of proteins as molecules that fold into well-defined structures: finding out how this process happens has been a major research focus over the last 50 years,” said Professor Michele Vendruscolo from Cambridge’s Centre for Misfolding Diseases, who led the research. “However, about a third of the proteins in our body do not fold, and instead remain in disordered shapes, sort of like noodles in a soup.”

We do not know much about the behavior of these disordered proteins, since traditional methods tend to address the problem of determining static structures, not structures in motion. The approach developed by the researchers harnesses the power of Google’s computer network to generate large numbers of short trajectories. The most common motions show up multiple times in these ‘movies’, making it possible to define the frequencies by which disordered proteins jumps between different shapes.

“By counting these motions, we can predict which states the occupies and how quickly it transitions between them,” said first author Thomas Löhr from Cambridge’s Yusuf Hamied Department of Chemistry.

The researchers focused their attention on the , a protein

Health article

Feeling Stressed? | NIH News in Health

January 2021






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Ways to Improve Your Well-Being

Have you been feeling more stressed than usual? Many people are during these challenging times. The COVID-19 pandemic has many people feeling overwhelmed.

Everyone feels stress sometimes. It’s a natural response to a challenge or demand. Stress can come from the day-to-day pressures of work and family.

But stress is much more than just being busy, explains Dr. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser of The Ohio State University, who studies the effects of stress on the body.

“It’s the feeling that you’re overloaded, out of control, and unable to cope,” she says.

Stress can also come from a sudden negative change in your life like a divorce or losing a job. Traumatic events like a major accident, assault, or natural disaster can cause severe stress.

It’s important for your health and well-being to learn how to cope with stress. Researchers are working to understand how stress affects health. They’re also studying ways to relieve stress. These techniques may help you to feel calmer and more relaxed.

Stress and the Body

Stress isn’t always bad. It’s actually a survival response. It helps you leap into action in the face of a threat. Your heart rate speeds up, and you breathe faster as you prepare to fight or run to safety.

Short-term stress can even help you perform—you’re more able to ace an interview or meet a project deadline. But when stress lasts a long time, it may also harm your health. Your body is constantly acting as if it were in immediate danger.

“There’s a really big body of research now that says that chronic stress promotes inflammationHeat, swelling, and redness caused by the body’s