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Caregiver Health: MedlinePlus

What is a caregiver?

A caregiver gives care to someone who needs help taking care of themselves. The person who needs help may be a child, an adult, or an older adult. They may need help because of an injury, chronic illness, or disability.

Some caregivers are informal caregivers. They are usually family members or friends. Other caregivers are paid professionals. Caregivers may give care at home or in a hospital or other health care setting. Sometimes they are caregiving from a distance. The types of tasks that caregivers do may include

  • Helping with daily tasks like bathing, eating, or taking medicine
  • Arranging activities and medical care
  • Making health and financial decisions

How does caregiving affect the caregiver?

Caregiving can be rewarding. It may help to strengthen connections to a loved one. You may feel fulfillment from helping someone else. But caregiving may also be stressful and sometimes even overwhelming. Caregiving may involve meeting complex demands without any training or help. You may also be working and have children or others to care for. To meet all of the demands, you might be putting your own needs and feelings aside. But that’s not good for your long-term health. But you need to make sure that you are also taking care of yourself.

What is caregiver stress?

Many caregivers are affected by caregiver stress. This is the stress that comes from the emotional and physical strain of caregiving. The signs include

  • Feeling overwhelmed
  • Feeling alone, isolated, or deserted by others
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Gaining or losing a lot of weight
  • Feeling tired most of the time
  • Losing interest in activities you used to enjoy
  • Becoming easily irritated or angered
  • Feeling worried or sad often
  • Having headaches or body aches often
  • Turning to unhealthy behaviors like smoking
Health article

Nonketotic hyperglycinemia – Genetics Home Reference

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  • Applegarth DA, Toone JR. Glycine encephalopathy (nonketotic hyperglycinaemia) : review and update. J Inherit Metab Dis. 2004;27(3):417-22. Review.

  • Applegarth DA, Toone JR. Glycine encephalopathy (nonketotic hyperglycinemia): comments and speculations. Am J Med Genet A. 2006 Jan 15;140(2):186-8.

  • Coughlin CR 2nd, Swanson MA, Kronquist K, Acquaviva C, Hutchin T, Rodríguez-Pombo P, Väisänen ML, Spector E, Creadon-Swindell G, Brás-Goldberg AM, Rahikkala E, Moilanen JS, Mahieu V, Matthijs G, Bravo-Alonso I, Pérez-Cerdá C, Ugarte M, Vianey-Saban C, Scharer GH, Van Hove JL. The genetic basis of classic nonketotic hyperglycinemia due to mutations in GLDC and AMT. Genet Med. 2017 Jan;19(1):104-111. doi: 10.1038/gim.2016.74. Epub 2016 Jun 30. Erratum in: Genet Med. 2018 Jan 04;:.

  • Dinopoulos A, Matsubara Y, Kure S. Atypical variants of nonketotic hyperglycinemia. Mol Genet Metab. 2005 Sep-Oct;86(1-2):61-9. Review.

  • Hoover-Fong JE, Shah S, Van Hove JL, Applegarth D, Toone J, Hamosh A. Natural history of nonketotic hyperglycinemia in 65 patients. Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1847-53.

  • Kikuchi G, Motokawa Y, Yoshida T, Hiraga K. Glycine cleavage system: reaction mechanism, physiological significance, and hyperglycinemia. Proc Jpn Acad Ser B Phys Biol Sci. 2008;84(7):246-63. Review.

  • Stence NV, Fenton LZ, Levek C, Tong S, Coughlin CR 2nd, Hennermann JB, Wortmann SB, Van Hove JLK. Brain imaging in classic nonketotic hyperglycinemia: Quantitative analysis and relation to phenotype. J Inherit Metab Dis. 2019 May;42(3):438-450. doi: 10.1002/jimd.12072. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

  • Swanson MA, Coughlin CR Jr, Scharer GH, Szerlong HJ, Bjoraker KJ, Spector EB, Creadon-Swindell G, Mahieu V, Matthijs G, Hennermann JB, Applegarth DA, Toone JR, Tong S, Williams K, Van Hove JL. Biochemical and molecular predictors for prognosis in nonketotic hyperglycinemia. Ann Neurol. 2015 Oct;78(4):606-18. doi: 10.1002/ana.24485. Epub 2015 Aug 10. Erratum

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    National Health Interview Survey 2017

    According to data from the 2017 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) released in November 2018, the number of American adults and children using yoga and meditation has significantly increased over previous years and the use of chiropractic has increased modestly for adults and held steady for children.

    See Press Release: More adults and children are using yoga and meditation: Nationwide survey reveals significant increases

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